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free trade

Depending on who you ask, it’s either the best of times or the worst of times for global trade. Protectionists villainize trade as damaging to U.S. workers, while on the other side of the coin pure laissez-faire traders consider free trade as a pure positive for the United States.
Mexico and China frequently are labeled as scapegoats for U.S. manufacturing decline.

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technological innovation

For years, policy discussions about America’s technological innovation-driven, high-tech economy have focused on just a few iconic places, such as the Route 128 tech corridor around Boston, Massachusetts; Research Triangle Park in Raleigh, Durham, and Chapel Hill, North Carolina; Austin, Texas; Seattle, Washington; and, of course, California’s white-hot Silicon Valley.

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Innovation

Editor’s Note: This is a guest blog from out good friend Adams Nagar. Adams Nager is an economic research analyst at the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation. Areas of interest include international competitiveness, macroeconomic theory, STEM education policy, and high-skilled immigration issues. Prior to ITIF, Adams was a student at Washington University in St.

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manufacturing innovation silicon valley

Editor’s Note: In this guest blog post from Adams Nager, of ITIF (Information Technology & Innovation Foundation), he stresses the importance of fostering innovation and spurring competitiveness of American Manufacturing by focusing on more R&D from both the public and private sectors.

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stem jobs pipeline

Even with the economic recovery, recent graduates have it rough. Unemployment among young people remains high and wages remain depressed. Frequently, graduates accept low-wage positions that do not utilize their degrees.

However, one group of recent graduates —those looking for STEM jobs—has it easier than their peers.

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STEM workers

Politicians talk frequently about job creation. But what actually creates jobs is a subject of intense debate. Do we need more public spending? Less? Fewer regulations? Smarter regulations? The answer usually depends on the audience and ignores the deeper questions.

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stem talent

Evidence of the  shortage of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) talent in the United States is plentiful. However, in an effort to stop immigration of high-skilled STEM workers, left wing advocates argue that there is no shortage. A new twist to their argument is to claim that STEM graduates do not always go into STEM fields and therefore are not in short supply.